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Southbend
SDDMAXDFY

South Bend Street Double Disc Clutch

Thoroughbred Sku #: SBCCLUTCHDOUBLEDISC

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$1,164.00 - $2,134.00

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Product Details

Product Name: South Bend Street Double Disc Clutch
Manufacturer: South Bend Clutch

Need Help? Check Out Our South Bend Clutch FAQ/Trouble Shooting Section.

South Bend Clutch Performance Kit Descriptions

Thoroughbred Diesel offers South Bend clutches for your Dodge Cummins, Ford Powerstroke, or GM Duramax diesel pickup truck. Depending on what you use your truck for or what performance modifications you have done will determine which clutch is best for your diesel. When you have single disc, double disc, triple disc, or street double disc clutches to choose from it can get very confusing for sure. To ensure you get the best clutch for your diesel truck read "choosing the right clutch" below, feel free to call us at 866-737-4966 with any questions.

If you are reading this, you might be in the market for a new clutch, and if so, you may have discovered there are many options. This segment was put together to help you choose the right one.

There are many things to consider. First, it is important that you learn a little something about a clutch. What it is, what it does and why one clutch might be considered "better" than another.

When people ask us for advice, we often hear the phrase "I just want the best clutch you have". Most customers believe that if one clutch has a higher power rating than another, that it somehow means it is better. That is not necessarily the case.

There are several reasons you might need to upgrade your clutch. You have increased the horsepower and torque of the engine, you may exceed the recommended towing capacity or the truck, or a combination of both. There is also the group of people who build up their trucks for competitions like sled pulling or drag racing.

So when you have people who just drive their trucks, people who work with their trucks and people who play with their trucks, you come to realize that they may all need different types of clutches. So the question is not "which is your best clutch?" it becomes "which clutch is best for my application?".

So do this. First figure out how much power you truck has. This may not be as easy as it sounds, because, unless you have had your truck on a dynamometer, there will be some guess work involved., It is important to get as close as you can. Many people don't realize that you can over-clutch a system. A clutch designed to hold 550 hp may not act right in a truck that only puts out 350 hp to the rear wheels. We often hear people say that they "might" add more power in the future. Realize that if you choose a clutch based on that, and you don't upgrade later, you might end up with parts you're not happy with.

Next. Decide what you want to do with your truck. Is it just a daily mode of transportation? Do you do any towing with it, if so, to what degree? Do you want to compete with it, if so how often? What size is your truck? Is it 2 or 4 wheel drive? Be specific. These are all important factors.

Here are some general rules:

  • The hp rating of the clutch should match or slightly exceed the estimated hp of the truck
  • Any truck used for competition sled-pulling should use an SFI approved multi-disc clutch.
  • Trucks that regularly tow 15,000 lbs or more should use a double disc clutch designed for the street, regardless of the hp level.
  • Trucks that are above the 450 RWHP which are used primarily for towing should use a street double disc. A full metallic single disc clutch is likely to engage too aggressively, especially on 2WD trucks.
  • High torque clutches often incorporate metallic linings which may cause an aggressive engagement. This may be even more apparent when towing.
  • Performance or high torque clutches may feel, drive or sound different than the factory system.

Remember, when vehicles are modified beyond their factory specifications or used above the factory limitations, to the point where a performance clutch is necessary, things are going to feel different. By choosing the right clutch for your application, you can minimize these effects. However, some of the differences in how a clutch feels or sounds may be necessary to make the clutch hold and last.

Here are some unreasonable requests:

  •  My truck puts 800 hp to the ground and I drive it every day and I want a clutch that doesn't push hard.
  • My truck only has 400 hp, so I just need a single disc clutch, but I want to sled pull once in a while.
  • I pull 20,000 lbs every day but I can't afford a double disc clutch. How many miles do you think I can get out of a single disc clutch?
  • This is the last clutch I ever want to put in my truck.

You need to realize that each clutch has limitations and that clutches that are built to hold extreme horsepower may not be the easiest clutch to drive on the street every day. So, as I said before, you need to decide what you want to do with your truck and understand that you are responsible for some of the consequences of trying to do too much.

When you are buying a clutch, keep on thing in mind. No clutch is indestructible. No matter who made it or what it is rated for, you can destroy it in a hurry if you don't use it properly. So if you are careful when choosing it and reasonable when using it, you can get the most out of your clutch.

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Reviews

  • Why Might My Clutch Slip If I Try To Accelerate In Overdrive?

    Eric Schumann | 5/16/2019

    Too much torque at too low an RPM. I go back to the automatic. If you were driving down the road in automatic overdrive, with the cruise control on, and approached a hill, the system (in order to keep a constant speed) would need to accelerate. The transmission would automatically downshift in order to do so. By keeping the RPM up while accelerating, it is preserving its life. There is a misconception about fuel consumption. People believe that the lower the RPM, the better the mileage, when actually, the opposite is true. All that black smoke you get when you step on it in overdrive is unburned (and therefore wasted) fuel. Keep the RPM up by downshifting into the right gear, and your truck will run much better.

  • Is It Wrong To Tow In Overdrive?

    Eric Schumann | 5/16/2019

    This is a very good question, because most people do just that. The trouble is, it is too hard, with all the variations in terrain, to keep a constant speed. Therefore, you end up accelerating too much in that high gear. Many trucks, with automatic transmissions, set up for towing, will include a button for "tow mode" which locks the transmission out of overdrive. The main reason for that is, the transmission would be constantly downshifting. The best answer is to say; watch your RPM, if it starts to drop too low, rather than stepping down on it in 6th, drop to 5th ...and maybe stay there.

  • Can I Sled-Pull With My Street Dual Disc Clutch?

    Eric Schumann | 5/16/2019

    The simple answer to that question is...no. The SDD was not designed for that purpose. That being said; I know people do it anyway. Some get away with it, and drive home (with both their feet), and some do not. The risk is that the amount of heat produced when you launch with a sled behind you, can fracture (and fragment) the cast iron plates in the clutch. Competition clutches are made out of steel for that very reason. Safety is a factor that should be considered above all.